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Dr. Maya E. Carrasquillo

Founding Director & Principal Investigator

Civil and Environmental Engineering, UC Berkeley

Born & raised in Albany, NY, Maya E. Carrasquillo (she/her/hers) is now an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and is the Principal Investigator of the Liberatory Infrastructures Lab (LiL) at the University of California, Berkeley. The mission of LiL is to develop systems of critical infrastructure that supports liberation and restorative justice for all. She holds a B.S. in Environmental Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering from the University of South Florida. Her research has primarily studied the intersections of stormwater management, environmental justice, and complex hydrosocial systems, particularly focusing on historically underserved communities to develop a conceptual framework for equitable decision-making. Her work employs mixed methods approaches including GIS, and qualitative methods which emphasize community engagement, ethnography, and co-creation of design solutions for critical infrastructure. Dr. Carrasquillo is a Huelskamp Faculty Fellow which recognizes a promising new assistant professor in UC Berkeley’s College of Engineering for their innovative research. She is also the faculty director of UC Berkeley’s new initiative for Community Engaged Education in Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE^2). Dr. Carrasquillo is a certified Envision Sustainability Professional (ENV SP) and EcoDistricts Accredited Professional (EcoDistricts AP).

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Who We Are

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Alexandra Grayson (she/her)

Alexandra is a first year PhD student in the Energy and Resources Group (ERG) studying environmental, economic, and energy justice. She has recently graduated with a Master's degree from ERG with her thesis focusing on the status of and application of mixed methods in improving tools for environmental and social justice goals. She is a GEM Fellow, where she’s worked on equitable distributed solar with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and continues to work on urban building energy modeling with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). She remains involved with local climate justice research and advocacy in her hometown through a fellowship with the Maryland League of Conservation Voters and as a Trustee on the Chesapeake Bay Foundation’s Board of Trustees.

Alexandra is working on an interdisciplinary urban building energy modeling effort with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The project is a US Department of Energy funded Urban Integrated Field Laboratory, located in Baltimore, Maryland called the Baltimore Social and Environment Collaborative (BSEC). Alexandra is working with researchers at Johns Hopkins University, Morgan State University, and Penn State University to apply political and decision-science, climate science and equity related insights into NREL’s URBANOpt model. The NREL team is applying the physics-based building-energy model to simulate a building energy transition across various neighborhoods in the City of Baltimore.

Fouzia Hossain Oyshi (she/her)

Fouzia is a third year PhD student focusing in environmental engineering. Her research interest lies in the intersection of stormwater management and environmental justice. She is currently exploring where environmental justice officially stands in current stormwater practices. She is working towards developing a framework for decision makers to execute environmental justice in stormwater management practice. Fouzia holds masters in civil engineering from the University of Texas at Arlington. She is from B-Baria, Bangladesh and loves to stay on the beach on a cloudy day. 

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J'Anna-Mare Lue (she/her)

J’Anna is a third year Civil and Environmental Engineering PhD student with an environmental engineering focus. She is interested in the reparative capacity of engineering in thinking through questions of climate justice in the Caribbean. Water and decoloniality are J'Anna's primary research interests as her work is concerned with inherited flood exposure risk. She has conducted water, sanitation, and hygiene research, worked with green stormwater infrastructure and potable water infrastructure planning. Her current work considers water resource management and water infrastructure design and planning. J'Anna has a MS in Environmental Engineering from Drexel University. In her free time, J'Anna is from Manchioneal, Jamaica. She loves reading, cooking Jamaican food, live music, dancing, and tending to her houseplants.

Jasmine McAdams (she/her)

Jasmine is a third year PhD student in the Energy & Resources Group (ERG) at U.C. Berkeley with a passion for supporting robust and equitable decision-making in climate and energy. Her research interests lie at the intersection of electric power system resilience, energy justice, utility regulation, and climate policy. Jasmine hopes to develop a better understanding of how climate impacts the grid and of the consequences these impacts may have at the community level. Prior to graduate school, Jasmine worked with the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, providing technical assistance to utility commissions across the country on topics such as energy justice and transportation electrification. This has inspired Jasmine to work at the nexus of engineering and decision-making to support a more resilient, people-centered, and carbon-free electric system. Additionally, as a native of Florida, Jasmine's personal experiences with grid vulnerability during extreme weather have led her to focus her research on the impacts of climate-induced power outages in the most at-risk and underinvested communities. Jasmine recently graduated with a master's degree from ERG.

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Jasmine McAdams (she/her)

Jasmine is a third year PhD student in the Energy & Resources Group (ERG) at U.C. Berkeley with a passion for supporting robust and equitable decision-making in climate and energy. Her research interests lie at the intersection of electric power system resilience, energy justice, utility regulation, and climate policy. Jasmine hopes to develop a better understanding of how climate impacts the grid and of the consequences these impacts may have at the community level. Prior to graduate school, Jasmine worked with the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, providing technical assistance to utility commissions across the country on topics such as energy justice and transportation electrification. This has inspired Jasmine to work at the nexus of engineering and decision-making to support a more resilient, people-centered, and carbon-free electric system. Additionally, as a native of Florida, Jasmine's personal experiences with grid vulnerability during extreme weather have led her to focus her research on the impacts of climate-induced power outages in the most at-risk and underinvested communities. Jasmine recently graduated with a master's degree from ERG.

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Kristida Chhour (she/her)

Kristida (she/her) is a third-year Ph.D. student studying environmental engineering. She is interested in the role of urban agriculture in food sovereignty, stormwater management, and climate resilience. Her current research focuses on how urban agriculture functions as green stormwater infrastructure. Many urban agriculture sites are operated by community organizations, which may not have the resources to formally measure and therefore gain recognition for the environmental and stormwater management impacts of their work at urban agriculture sites. This research project seeks to fill this gap by examining how urban agriculture functions as community-built green stormwater infrastructure, and in doing so, highlight community contributions to the urban ecosystem.


In her free time, Kristida enjoys growing, preparing, looking at, reading about, and, of course, eating food in the company of her two cats. Kristida is also involved with the Food Institute Graduate Council at Berkeley and supports undergraduate research projects at the UC Gill Tract Community Farm. Kristida's favorite fruit is yellow mangoes!

Bavisha Kalyan (she/her)

Bavisha is a newly minted Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering with a focus on Energy, Civil Infrastructure and Climate. She is interested in how we can create equitable partnerships that connect our engineering and research projects to ongoing social and environmental justice movements at the grassroots. Bavisha's doctoral project examined lead contamination, stemming from industrial legacy sources like lead-based paint and gasoline emissions,  a significant public health issues in cities. While there has been focus on contaminated water, persistent lead exposure from sources like paint and soil remain, resulting in elevated childhood blood lead levels. Her research centered around a community-driven project in partnership with the grassroots organization, the Newark Water Coalition in Newark, New Jersey. They co-created community science project surveyed homes and collected lead samples (paint, water, soil, dust) across the city, resulting in rich outcomes including environmental exposure assessment, STEM literacy, and youth empowerment. Her research journey is guided by a commitment to equitable and participatory systems Through her research, she has evolved into a scholar-activist focused on co-creating solutions to environmental health disparities stemming from critical urban infrastructure. In the future, she wants to explore how we can increase the accessibility of STEM and our research journeys through different means of storytelling.

​Bavisha enjoys learning to dance khatak, playing basketball, and surfing. She is from Mount Holly, New Jersey by way of Johannesburg South Africa. 

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